San Jeronimo Miramar

Yes, this is the much-famed Geisha coffee variety that is sought after by coffee enthusiasts around the world. To understand the true beauty of this coffee you must first understand where it was grown. The Bressani family has operated the beautiful Finca San Jeronimo Miramar for over 100 years. To call it just a coffee farm would be selling it short. Not only are some fantastic coffees being grown and cared for here, but also beautiful jersey dairy cows, honeybees, and exotic tropical fruits. Sitting high above all of this is a gorgeous, protected natural reserve. This forest is the lifeblood of the farm as its volcanic terrain feeds the farm’s natural fresh water springs and powers the farm’s entire processing facilities with hydroelectric power.

We had the pleasure to start our relationship with the Bressani’s on the grounds of Finca San Jeronimo this past year. Working with their farm and mill management team we helped to develop an understanding of the quality level for their current coffee production. Over the past few years farm administrator, Don Arnoldo Villagran, cultivated a plot of Geisha as an experiment through the suggestion of Anacafe. This experiment yielded some truly remarkable results, and lucky you have the chance to taste it for the first time in the US.

Geisha, a heirloom variety of Arabica coffee originating in Ethiopia, has taken the coffee world by storm over the past few years. The floral and stone fruit notes are as distinctive as they are nuanced in a manner really incomparable in other Arabica varieties. This offering from San Jeronimo is a wonderful expression of that and is a great way to kick off what is to become a great relationship over the years to come; with many more great coffees to show for it!

Giorgio (left) and Mark (right).  Father son duo from San Jeronimo Miramar.

Giorgio (left) and Mark (right). Father son duo from San Jeronimo Miramar.

Deeper Roots' Les Stoneham cupping with the team at Finca San Jeronimo Miramar

Deeper Roots’ Les Stoneham cupping with the team at Finca San Jeronimo Miramar

The diary cows on the farm.

The diary cows on the farm.

Drying patio at Finca San Jeronimo Miramar.

Drying patio at Finca San Jeronimo Miramar.

Don Arnoldo, the farm manager at Finca San Jeronimo.

Don Arnoldo, the farm manager at Finca San Jeronimo.

Geisha plants with Volcan Fuego in the background.

Geisha plants with Volcan Fuego in the background.

Geisha beans just weeks from being fully ripe.

Geisha beans just weeks from being fully ripe.

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Why not fresh espresso?

Why rest your espresso? Coffee in general is very volatile in the first few hours after roasting. Soon after a coffee comes out of the roaster it starts a process called de-gassing or off-gassing. This is mainly carbon dioxide (and some other delightfully long named science-y things) leaving the cell structure of the coffee bean and is the culprit for that amazing smell when you open a bag. When a coffee is roasted it will continually off-gas until it has completely staled but it’s important to wait at least 8-12 hours after roasting. A significant amount of gas is leaving the bean at this time and if you try to brew before allowing this time to pass you will get a really bubbly brew of coffee as well as a seemingly underdeveloped acidity in the cup. Sometimes this can lead to some vegetal notes as well and just overall makes for a really unbalanced. One-dimensional cup. To see just how much gas comes off fresh roasted coffee just put some in a sealed plastic bag for a day and all will be revealed.

Here at DRC we’ve found that resting brewed coffee for at least one day, or at least overnight, after roasting allows the volatile aromatic compounds to balance out and for the cup to be exactly what the roaster was intending. Since espresso is ground significantly finer and brewed under pressure this waiting period needs to be 4-7 days on average. We’ve had coffees here at DRC taste best as espresso after 10+ days but they are less common. As roasters and fanatics about quality we want to facilitate people at home and shops around the region brewing better espresso. So we’ve recently implemented a built in waiting time to most orders going out the door. Our wholesale shops may now notice a delivery of espresso that was roasted up to 4 days prior. This is beneficial because even if they have a built in waiting period in their shop to brew espresso several days after roast, they’re still brewing fresh espresso in the ideal resting time. If you brew espresso at home and purchase from your local shop, ask for espresso that is rested and enjoy a more balanced, nuanced espresso at home.